Bird Book

Click here for full-sized image
Anhinga - Juvenile

Anhinga - Juvenile

A Juvenile Anhinga.  The strong black and white colouring is yet to develop.  Shot in Taylor Park, Largo.

Click here for full-sized image
Anhinga

Anhinga

The Anhinga is also known as the Snake Bird.  Because its feathers do not have oil, it does not float.  When it is in the water, normally only the snake-like neck and head show.

Click here for full-sized image
Anhinga Preening

Anhinga Preening

Click here for full-sized image
Cormorant

Cormorant

Double Crested Cormorant
Phalacrocorax auritus

Click here for full-sized image
Duck - Lesser Scaup

Duck - Lesser Scaup

Lesser Scaup
Aythya affinis

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Reddish Egret

Egret - Reddish Egret

Reddish Egret
Egretta rufescens

This is a juvenile.

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Reddish Egret

Egret - Reddish Egret

Reddish Egret
Egretta rufescens

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Reddish Egret

Egret - Reddish Egret

Reddish Egret
Egretta rufescens

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Reddish Egret

Egret - Reddish Egret

Reddish Egret
Egretta rufescens

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Reddish Egret

Egret - Reddish Egret

Reddish Egrets are solitary.  This pair is probably because mating season is beginning.

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

Snowy Egret
Egretta thula

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

Egretta thula

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

Egretta thula

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

A close-up of the Snowy Egret's legs.  Notice how the black looks like it has been painted on.

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

Egretta thula

Click here for full-sized image
Egret - Snowy Egret

Egret - Snowy Egret

Click here for full-sized image
Godwit - Marbled Godwit

Godwit - Marbled Godwit

Marbled Godwit
Limosa fedoa

Click here for full-sized image
Godwit - Marbled Godwit

Godwit - Marbled Godwit

The Marbled Godwith is actually quite a big bird, about 13 inches in length with a 30 inch wingspan.  A few could be found at a particular saltwater pond at the north end of the North Beach in Fort DeSoto.

Click here for full-sized image
Grebe - Pie-Billed Grebe

Grebe - Pie-Billed Grebe

Pie-Billed Grebe
Podilymbus podiceps
The ringed bill of the Pie-Billed Grebe is only apparent during breeding season.

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Great Blue Heron

Heron - Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron
Ardea herodias

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Great Blue Heron

Heron - Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron
Ardea herodias

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Great Blue Heron

Heron - Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron
Ardea herodias

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Great Blue Heron

Heron - Great Blue Heron

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron
Egretta caerulea

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Egretta caerulea

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron
Egretta caerulea

he Little Blue has a length of 24" and wingspan of 40" compared to the Great Blue, which has a length 42" and a wingspan of 72 inches.

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron
Egretta caerulea

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron
Egretta caerulea
The Little Blue is 24" as compared with the Great Blue, which is 46".

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Egretta caerulea

This is a juvenile, just beginning to darken up.

The Little Blue has a length of 24" and wingspan of 40" compared to the Great Blue, which has a length 42" and a wingspan of 72 inches.

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Little Blue Heron

Heron - Little Blue Heron

Egretta caerulea

This is a juvenile, just beginning to darken up.

The Little Blue has a length of 24" and wingspan of 40" compared to the Great Blue, which has a length 42" and a wingspan of 72 inches.

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Tricoloured Heron
Egretta tricolor

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Tricoloured Heron
Egretta tricolor

The Tricoloured Heron looks like a Great Blue Heron, but is smaller, and has a white line down the front of its neck.

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Tricoloured Heron
Egretta tricolor

I am entertained by this shot, as the Heron looks like it is carved from wood and hand-painted.  But it is a real Tricoloured Heron.

Click here for full-sized image
Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Heron - Tricoloured Heron

Tricoloured Heron
Egretta tricolor

I am entertained by this shot, as the Heron looks like it is carved from wood and hand-painted.  But it is a real Tricoloured Heron.

Click here for full-sized image
Loon - Common Loon

Loon - Common Loon

Common Loon
Gavia immer

Click here for full-sized image
Loon - Common Loon

Loon - Common Loon

Common Loon
Gavia immer

Click here for full-sized image
Loon - Common Loon

Loon - Common Loon

Common Loon
Gavia immer

Mississippi Lake, near Carleton Place Ontario

Click here for full-sized image
Merganser - Red-breasted Merganser

Merganser - Red-breasted Merganser

Red-breasted Merganser
Mergus serrator

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelican - Brown Pelican

Brown Pelicans are impressive low-level fliers.  They can often be seen flying at water level.  When gliding, the breast feathers will almost touch the water.  Then as the bird flaps its wings, it will rise just enough to keep the down-stroke of the wing out of the water..

See the gallery devoted Brown Pelicans.

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelican - Brown Pelican

This Brown Pelican has bold breeding colours.  In the breeding season, the head is yellower, and the nape of the neck becomes dark brown.

See the gallery devoted Brown Pelicans.

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelican - Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican
(Pelicanus occidentalis)

See the gallery devoted Brown Pelicans.

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelican - Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican
(Pelicanus occidentalis)

See the gallery devoted Brown Pelicans.

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelican - Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican with fish hook.
Since Pelicans tend to be really comfortable around people, especially fishermen, it is not uncommon for one to be caught when the fisherman casts his lure.

You can imagine the excitement when you have a four foot bird struggling to get away.  The standard approach is to cut the line, if it doesn't break first.  The State Park Rangers suggest that the hook should be removed and instructions are posted in the parks, but you have to hang on to the bird to do it.

See the gallery devoted Brown Pelicans.

(They suggest that children should not try to remove the hooks.)

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelican - Brown Pelican

Pelicans Posing
See the gallery devoted Brown Pelicans.

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - White Pelican

Pelican - White Pelican

American White Pelican
Pelicanus erythrorhyncos

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - White Pelican

Pelican - White Pelican

American White Pelican
Pelicanus erythrorhynchos
For many, there is a laterally flattened "horn" that you can see on the bill.  This falls off after mating.
These birds are huge.  The weight is typically 11 to 20 pounds.  Wingspan can be ten feet.

Click here for full-sized image
Pelican - White Pelican

Pelican - White Pelican

White Pelican
Pelicanus crythrorhynchos

Click here for full-sized image
Plover - Black-bellied Plover

Plover - Black-bellied Plover

Black-bellied Plover
Pluvialis squatarola

Click here for full-sized image
Plover - Black-Bellied Plover

Plover - Black-Bellied Plover

Black-Bellied Plover
Pluvialis squatorola

Click here for full-sized image
Plover - Black-bellied Plover

Plover - Black-bellied Plover

Juvenile Black-bellied Plover
Pluvialis squatarola

Click here for full-sized image
Great Egret

Great Egret

A Great Egret spotted near the pier at John's Pass Village.  Great Egrets can be distinguished from Snowy Egrets because they are bigger by a foot or so and have all-black legs and feet.  The bill of a Snowy Egret is all black, while this one clearly has yellow.

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_0411

ND3_0411

A Great Egret in the early evening at the Pier.  Great Egrets can be distinguished from Snowy Egrets because they are bigger by a foot or so and have all-black legs and feet.  The bill of a Snowy Egret is all black, while this one clearly has yellow.

Click here for full-sized image
Great Egret

Great Egret

A nice head and shoulders (well, head) shot of a Great Egret.  This one was hanging around the North Fishing Pier at the Sunshine Skyway.  Perhaps he was looking for handouts from the few fishermen who were there.  And, indeed, he was given at least one small handout while I was there.

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_0891

ND3_0891

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9097

DSC_9097

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9684 - Great Egret

DSC_9684 - Great Egret

A Great Egret in flight.  The position of the head and neck can be helpful when spotting a bird from a distance.  In this case, though, there is little doubt because the colours are vivid.

Click here for full-sized image
Yellow-Crowned Night Heron

Yellow-Crowned Night Heron

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_23856

ND2_23856

Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Nyctanassa violacea

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_21891

ND2_21891

Juvenile Yellow-Crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violacea)

Click here for full-sized image
Wood Duck

Wood Duck

Aix sponsa
Seen at Mud Lake, Ottawa

Click here for full-sized image
Northern Pintail

Northern Pintail


Anas acuta

Click here for full-sized image
RX1_02049

RX1_02049

Northern Pintail
Anas acuta

Click here for full-sized image
Double Crested Cormorant

Double Crested Cormorant

Normally the cormorant rests atop a pole, usually the higher the better.  I found a trio of them on the beach at Fort DeSoto and was able to get quite close.

A largish bird, about 33 inches, the Double-Crested Cormorant is almost always alone.  This day on the beach was an exception, but it was also spring (breeding season).  Notice the thick legs.

Click here for full-sized image
Green Heron

Green Heron

Butorides virescens

Click here for full-sized image
Juvenile White Ibis

Juvenile White Ibis

Eudocimus albus

Click here for full-sized image
White Ibis

White Ibis

Juvenile White Ibis
Eudocimus albus

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_24046

ND3_24046

Juvenile Roseate Spoonbill
Platalea ajaja

Click here for full-sized image
Wood Stork

Wood Stork

Wood Stork
(Mycteria americana)

Click here for full-sized image
Double-Crested Cormorant

Double-Crested Cormorant

The Double-Crested Cormorant dives for its food, and dives quite deeply, I think.  When they disappear under, you are not sure where they will re-appear.

This is about as good as it will get without going underwater with the camera.  The cormorant has just dived under and we can still see its head.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9688 - Double-Crested Cormorant

DSC_9688 - Double-Crested Cormorant

A Double-Crested Cormorant after a successful dive.  Taken from the North Fishing Pier of the Sunshine Skyway.

Click here for full-sized image
Canada Goose

Canada Goose

And, while we're on the topic of Canada, Penticton does also host a pretty healthy looking Canada Goose.

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_19512

ND3_19512

Roseate Spoonbill
Platalea ajaja

Not just another pretty face.

More bird shots can be seen in Serious Bird Shots

Click here for full-sized image
Red Shouldered Hawk

Red Shouldered Hawk

Click here for full-sized image
Osprey

Osprey

Osprey
Pandion haliaetus
See more Osprey in Osprey.

Click here for full-sized image
Osprey

Osprey

Osprey
Pandion haliaetus
See more Osprey in Osprey.

Click here for full-sized image
Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle


Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_17746

ND3_17746

Bald Eagle

This one of a nesting pair at Honeymoon Island State Park near Dunedin, Florida.

Click here for full-sized image
Warbler - Palm Warbler

Warbler - Palm Warbler

Palm Warbler
Dendroica palmarum

Click here for full-sized image
Willet

Willet

Catoptrophorus semipalmatas

Click here for full-sized image
Willet

Willet

Willet
Catoptrophorus semipalmatas

Click here for full-sized image
Willet

Willet

Catoptrophorus semipalmatas

Click here for full-sized image
Willet

Willet

Catoptrophorus semipalmatas
A Willet at Madeira Beach.  On this particular morning, the light was very flat.  Notice that there no sign of a shadow. 

Click here for full-sized image
Willet

Willet

This bird is a little over a foot in length.  It hangs around the seacoasts as far North as the Canadian Maritimes.

The Willets follow the waves as they roll back away from the shore, looking for small bits of food that are deposited in the process.  When the next wave comes along, they scamper for higher ground, and repeat the process.

Here a Willet is chased by the incoming wave.  Notice how the wave has wrapped around its leg.

Click here for full-sized image
Willet

Willet

Catoptrophorus semipalmatas
The Willet is about a foot and half, making it much bigger than some of the other little waders that scamper around in the surf.

Click here for full-sized image
Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone
Arenaria interpres

Click here for full-sized image
Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

The robin-sized Ruddy Turnstone is really common if you happen to be where they hang out.  In the summer they are on the coasts of the high Arctic and in the winter around the southerly coasts of the continent. 

Click here for full-sized image
Dunlin

Dunlin

Calidris alpina

Click here for full-sized image
Least Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Calidris minutilla

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_29920

ND2_29920

Click here for full-sized image
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull

Only a handful of the Laughing Gulls had this dark handsome head.  It's probably because of molting or some changes which take place in the spring.

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_23710

ND2_23710

Laughing Gull
Larus atricilla

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_3437

ND3_3437

Laughing Gull
Larus Atricilla

Click here for full-sized image
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull

Click here for full-sized image
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull

Click here for full-sized image
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull

Click here for full-sized image
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull

Click here for full-sized image
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull

Click here for full-sized image
composite

composite

Seen at Fort De Soto.

Click here for full-sized image
Ring-Billed Gull

Ring-Billed Gull

The Ring-Billed Gull is largish and very common.  It is a "three year" gull, changing from birth through the first three years.  The pink legs and brownish tones suggest that this one is in its second year.  In the youngest gulls, the whole bill is black.

Click here for full-sized image
Ring-Billed Gull

Ring-Billed Gull

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9154

DSC_9154

An older Ring-Billed Gull.  The distinct black ring on the bill and the yellowish legs mean that this bird is in its third (or later) year.

Click here for full-sized image
Lesser Black-Backed Gull

Lesser Black-Backed Gull

I'm pretty sure about the identification, as the more common, Great Black-Backed Gull has a red ring around the eye, and this one doesn't.

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_29996

ND2_29996

Great Black-backed Gull
Larus marinus

This gull is common on the Atlantic coast, but is quite rare on the Gulf coast, so

Click here for full-sized image
Great Black-Backed Gull

Great Black-Backed Gull

The The Great Black-Backed Gull can be up to 30" in length, with a wingspan of almost seven feet.  While walking the beach at Hollywood Beach, this one caught my attention because of its size.  It was a giant among the more numerous Ring-Billed and Laughing Gulls.

It could be a Herring Gull, but it was truly large and seems to have more white than a Herring.  This one would be in its first winter of life.

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_1075

ND3_1075

Razorbill
Alco torda
This was a time when my friend Dee and I were shooting at the north end of Longboat Key. 
We were approached by a stranger who said that there was great excitement at the north end of Anna Maria, because there was a Penguin there.
Well, stuff like that needs to be checked out!  And here it is!  And it is rare indeed.  A Razorbill, not often seen on the Gulf side.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9840

DSC_9840

Royal Tern
Sterna maxima

Click here for full-sized image
Royal Tern

Royal Tern

This common guy, the Royal Tern, is distinguished from the Sandwich Tern by his yellow bill.  About 18-21" long.  I see that this one has been banded.

The Royal Tern flies above the water at about 30 feet, occasionally crashing headfirst into the surf, presumably to catch something.

Click here for full-sized image
Royal Tern

Royal Tern

Sterna maxima

Click here for full-sized image
Royal Tern

Royal Tern

Sterna maxima

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9765 - Royal Tern

DSC_9765 - Royal Tern

This common guy is distinguished from the Sandwich Tern by his yelow bill.  About 18-21" long. 

The Royal Tern flies above the water at about 30 feet, occasionally crashing headfirst into the surf, presumably to catch something.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_21579

DSC_21579

Male Royal Tern tries to impress the female.  Nesting time is approaching.

Click here for full-sized image
Sandwich Tern

Sandwich Tern

The Sandwich Tern is distinguished from other terns by his black bill with the yellow tip. 

Click here for full-sized image
Forster's Tern

Forster's Tern

Forster's Tern in beginning to acquire breeding colours.  These don't seem to be all that common on the beaches around here.  At twelve inches overall length, the Common Tern is about half the size of the Royal Tern, but definitely shows its relationship.  Shot at Indian Rocks Beach. 

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_13497 - Common Tern in Flight

DSC_13497 - Common Tern in Flight

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_29911

ND2_29911

Forster's Tern
Sterna forsteri

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9240 - Black Skimmer

DSC_9240 - Black Skimmer

These unusual birds have a longer lower beak; it extends beyond the upper.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9240 - Black Skimmer

DSC_9240 - Black Skimmer

After looking at my photographs I had to wonder whether these birds have eyes.  Even on the beach in the sunlight, it is impossible to see their eyes.

This photograph shows that they are, indeed, sighted.  Even then, you have to look carefully to see the small black eye.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9189 - Great Blue Heron

DSC_9189 - Great Blue Heron

I made my initial photographs of this Great Blue Heron from behind a bush on the shore.  As I move away from the bush, in its direction, it became a little nervous.  It finally took off, coming back less than a minute later.

The land behind are the flats exposed at low tide.  The light was very red the on this February morning, even though it was about an hour after sunrise. 

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_0534

ND3_0534

Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus)

These tiny guys winter along the southern coast and spend their summers in the far north.  In this case, I found a few hanging around the East Beach, with a group of Willets, Ruddy Turnstones and Sanderlings.

This flock was intent on grabbing some shut-eye, so I was unable to get a shot of the bird with both legs in the water.

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_36511

ND2_36511

Piping Plover
Charadrius melodus

Click here for full-sized image
Lesser Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs
Tringa flavipes

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_21790

ND2_21790

American Oystercatcher
(Haematopus palliatus)

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_21801

ND2_21801

American Oystercatcher
(Haematopus palliatus)

Click here for full-sized image
Sanderling

Sanderling

Calidris alba
A group of Sanderlings, a small sandpiper about the size of a Robin.  These birds hang around, running back and forth like a wind-up toy, chasing the waves as they retreat and then running back before the next wave washes over them.  They look for little bits of food which the waves drop on the beach. 

Click here for full-sized image
Sanderling

Sanderling

A Willet, in the background, gives some scale to the Sanderling as it heads toward the outrolling wave.

Click here for full-sized image
Sanderling

Sanderling

Calidris alba

The Sanderling is tiny, about the size of a Robin.  They are abundant along the beaches, where they chase the retreating waves like little wind-up toys.

Click here for full-sized image
Sanderling

Sanderling

Calidris alba

Click here for full-sized image
Common Moorhen

Common Moorhen

This solitary Moorhen was in a small pond off of Country Club Drive in Aventura, Florida.

Click here for full-sized image
Common Moorhen

Common Moorhen

A Common Moorhen.  I was taken with the brilliance of his red beak.  In the winter, the red is quite muted and may not be apparent at all.  Some of the other Moorhens in this pond in Largo did not yet have the same brilliance.

Click here for full-sized image
Limpkin

Limpkin

Limpkin
Aramus guarauna

Limpkin with shot at sunset, preparing for its evening meal.  Limpkins are very uncommon outside of Florida.  With a lenght of 26 inches and a weight of 2.4 pounds, they look like giant waders, but five times the size of a Willet, for example.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9577 - Hooded Merganseer

DSC_9577 - Hooded Merganseer

This Hooded Merganser was spotted swimming in the pond of an RV Park on Sanibel Island.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9873 - Mallard Pair

DSC_9873 - Mallard Pair

This pair of Mallards was in a small pond on Country Club Drive in Aventura, Florida

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_10083 - Turkey Vulture

DSC_10083 - Turkey Vulture

Few birds are uglier, if you look them in the face.  Here the Turkey Vulture's small, naked red head can be easily seen.  This one was cruising low over the old bridge at Bahai Honda State Park on Pine Key in Florida.

A diurnal raptor, the Turkey Vulture is extremely common in the Florida Keys.  In Key West we saw nearly a dozen in close proximity cruising above the waterway.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_10081 - Swallow-Tailed Kite

DSC_10081 - Swallow-Tailed Kite

The Swallow-Tailed Kite is uncommon, but unmistakable.  It is moderately large, with a wingspan of about four feet.  This one was shot from the old bridge at Bahai Honda State Park on Pine Key in Florida.  It was taking full advantage of the breeze and hovering in a limited area for most of the afternoon.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_2104 - Sandhill Crane

DSC_2104 - Sandhill Crane

A Sandhill Crane, seen beside the golf course in the Clermont area.  This bird can be up to four feet tall and may have a wing span of seven feet.

Click here for full-sized image
White Ibis

White Ibis

A White Ibis tries a little taste of coaxial cable, while standing on the television antenna of the RV across the road from us.  This bird struts carefully around the campground when things are quiet.  With the cold, dreary weather, things are really quiet and the bird goes just about anywhere.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9202 - Bald Eagle

DSC_9202 - Bald Eagle

I grabbed this lucky shot of this Bald Eagle as I was leaving the Fort DeSoto beach one morning.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9547 - Red-Shouldered Hawk

DSC_9547 - Red-Shouldered Hawk

This bird looks tiny in this photo, but they range in size from 17 to 24 inches.  I would have put him at around 18 inches.

The Florida version of the Red Shouldered Hawk is much paler than the same species outside of Florida.  The other possibility is that this is a Broad-Winged Hawk but they are not as likely to be found in Florida.  Also the tail- banding of the bird in this photo points to the Red Shouldered species.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9813 - Monk Parakeet

DSC_9813 - Monk Parakeet

This shot looks a little like a scan of a pet shop brochure because the background is actually a bit of outdoor carpet in a mini-putt.  This was one of a pair that were busy on the ground before the min-putt opened.

The Monk Parakeet is pretty hardy; while this one was seen on Hollywood Beach, they can occur as far north as Chicago.

Click here for full-sized image
Nanday Parakeet

Nanday Parakeet

Black-Hooded Parakeet
Nandayus nenday

Click here for full-sized image
Lorikeet

Lorikeet

Trichoglossus moluccanus
Radio Amateur, trying to improve the reception.

Click here for full-sized image
Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet

Trichoglossus moluccanus

Click here for full-sized image
Barred Owl

Barred Owl

Barred Owl.  Strix varia
This is a medium-size (21") owl.  This one was in the Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, a sanctuary for the Florida Cypress Tree.

Click here for full-sized image
Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

No bird in North America is more exotic than the Pileated Woodpecker; it's extremely hard to get a good look at one of these.  This particular bird showed up at our Fort De Soto campsite and was shot through the window.  He must have been young, since he seemed only a foot or so in size.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_13990 - Red-bellied Woodpecker

DSC_13990 - Red-bellied Woodpecker

This guy was unusually sociable for a woodpecker.

I don't know why they are called Red-bellied.  This is a male; his red covers the crown and the nape.  The red in the female covers only the nape.  This was one of a pair seen through the window at our Fort De Soto camp site.

Click here for full-sized image
Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker
Picoides pubescens

Click here for full-sized image
Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee
Poecile atricapella

Click here for full-sized image
American Robin

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Click here for full-sized image
American Robin

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Click here for full-sized image
Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler
Dendroica coronata

Click here for full-sized image
Northern Mockingbird

Northern Mockingbird

Northern Mockingbird
Mimus polyglottos

Click here for full-sized image
Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting

Passerina ciris

Click here for full-sized image
ND3_28585

ND3_28585

Northern Cardinal
Cardinalis cardinalis

Click here for full-sized image
Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal
Cardinalis cardinalis

Click here for full-sized image
Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-Winged Blackbird
Agelaius phoenicus
Juvenile or Female

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9880 - Brewer's Blackbird

DSC_9880 - Brewer's Blackbird

This seems like it might be a particularly light-coloured female Brewer's Blackbird.  Seen next a pond on Country Club Drive in Aventura.

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_9861 - Fish Crow

DSC_9861 - Fish Crow

I am guessing this to be a Fish Crow.  I thought it was too small to be an American Crow.  The Fish Crow is common near the coast, but is reliably identified only by its call, which I didn't hear.

This one was spotted near the Boardwalk at Hollywood Beach, Florida.

Click here for full-sized image
NZ6_00894

NZ6_00894

Dark-eyed Junco
Junco hyemalis

Click here for full-sized image
ND2_9157 - Brown-Headed Cowbird

ND2_9157 - Brown-Headed Cowbird

Click here for full-sized image
NZ6_00692

NZ6_00692

Common Redpoll
Carduelis flammea

Click here for full-sized image
NZ6_00612

NZ6_00612

Chipping Sparrow
Spizella passerina

Click here for full-sized image
DSC_10036 - Key West Rooster

DSC_10036 - Key West Rooster

Roosters are to Key West as cows are to India.  The roosters are everywhere, wild, handsome and healthy.  We were told that they are the legacy of a period when cock-fighting was legal. 

When cockfighting was banned the roosters were turned out to fend for themselves.

Strangely, we only saw a couple of hens.  They must be stay-at-homes.

Click here for full-sized image
Vulture - Turkey Vulture

Vulture - Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture
Cathartes aura